Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) 1080p YIFY Movie

Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) 1080p

Meet Me in St. Louis is a movie starring Judy Garland, Margaret O'Brien, and Mary Astor. In the year leading up to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, the four Smith daughters learn lessons of life and love, even as they prepare for a...

IMDB: 7.62 Likes

  • Genre: Comedy | Drama
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 2.16G
  • Resolution: / fps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 113
  • IMDB Rating: 7.6/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 6 / 4

The Synopsis for Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) 1080p

St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters, including Esther and little Tootie. 17-year old Esther has fallen in love with the boy next door who has just moved in, John. He however barely notices her at first. The family is shocked when Mr. Smith reveals that he has been transfered to a nice position in New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis and the St. Louis Fair.


The Director and Players for Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) 1080p

[Director]Vincente Minnelli
[Role:]Mary Astor
[Role:]Margaret O'Brien
[Role:]Judy Garland
[Role:]Lucille Bremer


The Reviews for Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) 1080p


More Of A Chick Flick Than A MusicalReviewed byccthemovieman-1Vote: 6/10

Being a woman's movie, this classic is more appealing to a female than a male. It centers more on romances than on anything else, even though it's probably listed as a musical. Most of the characters, though, were interesting even to me: someone who doesn't like "chick flicks."

Child actor Margaret O'Brien, in her first starring role, is okay but a little annoying with her emoting. She sure was a ham in her child acting career in the 1940s. Judy Garland, meanwhile, well.....I certainly can't knock her voice but she was too strange-looking. Perhaps it was her hairdo, which made the shape of her head look too triangular. She just looked odd.

Leon Ames, as head "Mr. Alonzo Smith," of the household, played the most likable character, followed by Harry Davenport as the grandpa.

As for the music, "The Trolley Song" was my favorite although I admit I found myself humming the title tune for several days after watching this. Although billed as a musical, the stories in here were played up much more than the songs, of which there were only a half dozen.

The costuming of the ladies and of the period (turn of the 20th century) were beautiful, as was the Technicolor. If you enjoy color, this is pretty film to watch.

A bit of cake and a song to blow away the wind of change.Reviewed bySpikeopathVote: 9/10

A film that is firmly ticking all the boxes for those looking for a family classic to admire and tap your feet along with. This delightful musical deals with one family and their struggle to deal with the changing of the times at the turn of the century. When the Father is requested to move to New York permanently with his job, the rest of the family are not that keen to leave their memories and their beloved home in St. Louis, and in to the mix is the varying degrees of blossoming love involving the elder daughters and their respective beaus.

This film is just so gorgeous on many fronts, the colour beautifully realises the tremendous scope director Vincent Minnelli brings with his recreation of the era, the attention to detail is quality supreme. The story is good and earthy, a sort of tale to have the viewer hankering for the good old days before the world got itself in one big hurry. The songs are crackers, enjoy standards such as The Boy Next Door, The Trolley Song, and the simply precious Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas. The cast are across the board doing good work but it is of course Judy Garland who carries the movie firmly on her slender shoulders, and here she has never been prettier, and her voice is practically as good as it ever was in her career.

A film for all the family to enjoy, a film that is from the top echelons of musicals, and a film that simply demands you relax and enjoy.

Right, I'm off to get a piece of cake... 9/10

The Happiness of Not Moving--At Least for NowReviewed byloken-1Vote: 10/10

One of the greatest movie musicals, and thus one of the greatest American movies, "Meet Me in St. Louis" tells a story that may appear insultingly inconsequential: a happy family living in turn-of-the-century St. Louis considers moving to New York, but decides against it. Yet Vincente Minelli, working with a wonderful cast and unusually intelligent songs, takes this story and makes it the one really convincing screen refutation of Tolstoy's claim that all happy families are alike, and indeed perhaps the only fully rounded and persuasive representation of a happy family in the history of movies. From the small family conflict over the quality of homemade ketchup that begins the movie, to the agony over moving at the end, the Smiths are a collection of distinctive, vibrant and at times almost incompatible characters bound together not only by love but by a contagious, and very particular, sense of fun.

Minelli's genius for musical numbers in interior spaces--most notably the great party in the Smith home near the beginning of the movie--is complemented here by two unforgettable outdoor sequences, Judy Garland's matchless "Trolley Song" and Tootie's Halloween adventure in the neighborhood, where she shows such vulnerability, such courage,and in the end such diabolical lack of conscience that no one can fail to love her. These outdoor scenes protect "Meet in St. Louis" from the claustrophobia that so frequently limits the power of "family" dramas.

Tootie, at five, is the youngest of the five Smith children, and as played by the great child actor Margaret O'Brien, she is also the center of most of the fun. Her relationship with her older sister Esther (Judy Garland) is captivating in its joy, complexity, and ultimately in its sadness. For even though the catastrophe (!) of moving to New York is narrowly avoided, Esther will still leave home for life with the boy next door, and the powerful unity of these lucky people will ultimately give way to other claims of new love, new suffering and new duty. The happiness the Smiths knew while living together will only increase the pain of each parting. We're blessed, though, to have glimpsed their particular brand of happiness at its glorious peak.

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